The Oddball Show

The Oddball Show Episode 3.5: Jason talks about his new book, Train of Thought and Speaking Out with NAMI

May 23, 2019 Season 3 Episode 5
The Oddball Show
The Oddball Show Episode 3.5: Jason talks about his new book, Train of Thought and Speaking Out with NAMI
Chapters
The Oddball Show
The Oddball Show Episode 3.5: Jason talks about his new book, Train of Thought and Speaking Out with NAMI
May 23, 2019 Season 3 Episode 5
Oddball Magazine and JP Lime, Prof, Jason Wright
Prof and Jason talk about Jason's new book Train of Thought and his recent speech at NAMI Walk Boston
Show Notes Transcript

This week Prof and Jason talk about Jason's recent speech at the NAMI Walk in Boston and Jason's new book "Train of Thought, Poems from the Red Line".  



Speaker 1:
0:00
It is jarring to read. Um, yeah, and I think that might be the best part about this book is that it takes you from, from the the first stop to the last stop and you're like, Holy Shit, I need to get off this train. And um, and that's train of thought,
Speaker 2:
0:19
but it's really cool to advocate and tell that story just to know that like you can, but I also feel like you're short selling yourself. You can live a good life even if you have ones like fuck that. You know what I mean? Like why can't you just live a good life?
Speaker 3:
0:40
You are not alone. You can be whoever you want to be. You got this, I got your back and everyone here does too. Now let's enjoy this walk. Go out as to what? Nami. Thank you. Thank you
Speaker 4:
0:59
Jason. Outstanding.
Speaker 5:
1:04
This is the odd ball show. A podcasting collaboration from [inaudible] lot productions and oddball magazine. Huh?
Speaker 2:
1:14
Okay.
Speaker 4:
1:21
Good evening. All you poets and Beckett arms. This is indeed the odd ball show. My Name is prof and I'll play the lion tamer here in this three ring three ball circus here beside me for each and every odd ball show in a metaphoric slash, cyber. Since he's our own Charlene on the train of thought, the conductor, founder and editor in chief who, uh, steam engine known as odd ball magazine, please say hello to Mr Jason, right.
Speaker 1:
1:47
Hey Prof, uh, how's it going? What's up buddy? Oh, nothing much. Just, uh, just, uh, uh, live on a Monday night, uh, ready to, uh, talk with our guests. Who's our guests this evening?
Speaker 4:
2:01
We actually, I want, I want to tell you two things about what you just said. Why don't we have no guests tonight? It's just you and me. We're, we're going to talk about, uh, some very interesting topics, including I'm your new book train of thought that's a available, which was, I just referenced a very cleverly in our intro, which we'll explain that clever efforts in a minute. And also talking about your recent talk at the Nami walk here in, which is pretty interesting and we're going to talk about, um, I'm part of a hip hop duo called blind rhino and we'll talk about our recent release, both, uh, uh, album and video. So we've got it. We've got plenty to talk about just between the two of us. We have no guests tonight and put the other thing to tell you is that it is not Monday.
Speaker 4:
2:43
It's Tuesday. Yeah. So I just want to be sure that you didn't mess anything up during your day. I didn't want to show you went to work, went to the proper like shift or whatever it is you should do on a Tuesday. Today is, today is actually Tuesday. So thank you to our abuse. Actually to our viewers, it doesn't really matter because they're going to tune in and whatever the hell they tune and it certainly won't be tonight because this is not live. So it really doesn't matter to you. I just wanna make sure that your, your day didn't get messed up because yeah.
Speaker 1:
3:07
Awesome. I'll tell you that viewers, we have no viewers. We have readers. Wait, nope, sorry. That was an awesome correction. Listen problem.
Speaker 4:
3:21
Use their eyes. Listen to the odd ball show they read the automobile show.
Speaker 1:
3:26
Oh Man. Oh Jason, I don't
Speaker 4:
3:29
thank you to all our viewers, our listeners here on the odd ball show. Um, you can get the odd ball show on Spotify, iTunes, stitcher, all the great places you get fun podcasts. Um, and you can also tune in through our various social media networks. Uh, uh, the oddball show on Facebook, um, Audubon magazine on Twitter and JP lime on Twitter. Um, we'll talk about the coordination between those two avenues in a moment, but, um, that's how you can hook up with us and find out more about us and talk to us directly. So thank you for tuning in and please leave us a review on iTunes if you have a spare 20 seconds or so.
Speaker 1:
4:09
Yeah, absolutely. Uh, also if you want to have fun with Alexa, which everyone wants to have fun with Alexa on a Monday night like we're doing right now. Um, you can say Alexa, uh, play oddball show on tuning and it will come up and, uh, after a few a frustrated tries, it'll play a, the audible show on tune in radio.
Speaker 4:
4:31
Because what I wanted to mention about that is you're showing your, uh, your Mac buys. You can also do that on any sparks, smart speaker and on what is that Alexa? It know, it's not a no frustration. So pro say you say, okay, Google play the odd ball show and it's like, Oh yes, I know exactly what you're talking about.
Speaker 1:
4:49
Yeah, it's pretty cool actually. I, we, uh, I like it, you know? Yeah, it's really cool. Smart speakers, a little creepy, but it's, it's pretty awesome for us as content creators. So, you know, it's actually, yeah, no, I mean, hey, like look, we can like talk to a robot, but also they can see inside our house when we're changing their clothes, you give a little, you get a little bit, but you know, you can listen to music in your kitchen. So I know, right. So you have that like I imagine are tailor made for you. Yeah.
Speaker 4:
5:25
But also the robots are gonna take over the world. So you see tapes, it's really, you know, a little bit of this, a little bit of that, you know, there's no right answer.
Speaker 1:
5:34
I mean, whenever you're thinking can actually be a broadcast it onto the ads that year that you would like. But, uh, that's,
Speaker 4:
5:41
that's the super creepiest thing. Like, and, and I know at some point I linked to my, um, my Google searching between my laptop and my con, my phone. But like now it just does it automatically. And that's kind of creepy. Yeah. I Dunno. I like I, I'm one who uses that shit all the, like, uh, every technology available to me and I try to be conscientious about my security and shit, but I'm open to all that, but it's a little bit creepy and I can totally see how a little bit creepy turns into, you know, it takes over our world and now we're slaves to the machine and it's the matrix and terminator at the same time.
Speaker 1:
6:17
Yeah. As skynet I would actually say, yeah, I'm, I'm techno fluid, um, about, uh, all of the different, uh, good word. Yeah. Thanks for going over that. Um, so, so, you know, hey, we're, we're no spring chickens anymore. At least I'm not. Um, and I'm lucky that I know how to use a computer, but I'll tell you what, um, you know, like millennials, right? I'm just like a step away from not from, from um, out of a millennial. Think about the people who are like 10 years, five years older than me. Um, they are screwed. Like, you know what I mean? Like for like, no. Imagine people who are 10, 20 years old and you like, they are screwed. Like trying to learn and keep up with the Internet, like screwed.
Speaker 4:
7:02
You know what I'm saying? That my parents kind of have the it down. Like they know how it works. My grandparents, it's fucking confusing as fuck. But my, my parents didn't they they got it. Yeah.
Speaker 1:
7:13
You know what my mom uses AOL and a, she once had her,
Speaker 4:
7:18
I did not know all
Speaker 1:
7:20
she wants it, her laptop hijacked and she had true story. She had her laptop hijacked, meaning like it was locked, but by some scammers I hurt her and she had to like, she had to, I don't know how she ended up getting her laptop freed from her so she could use it. But um, yeah, so I'm just saying like some people don't really get technology.
Speaker 4:
7:48
That's a good point.
Speaker 1:
7:50
So I love you mom, you know, but yeah, man, I mean for us, I mean, I prompt how good are you at snapchat right now when we tell you how was your snapchat name?
Speaker 4:
8:03
I want you to know that I have sworn off snapchat. We're not going to get too deep into this because it's kind of a sensitive topic for me. But
Speaker 1:
8:10
where is this activation in my activating you right now?
Speaker 4:
8:12
No, I'm not, I'm not, I'm not necessarily triggered by snapchat. I'm just, yeah, I'm old person. I feel old when we, when we say the word snapchat, but here's why. Here's why specifically. So we're going to talk about in the second segment about, um, my, uh, my group blind rhino and we just realized we just launched on social media and everything. We had a different name. We relaunched under the new name. We actually really start album released a video. So we'll talk about that in segment two. But, uh, you know, we, I let all our social media stuff and I specifically chose not to do snapchat and it was a point that I really wanted to, but it's just, I can't, I can't, I've been trying to, and, and here's the other thing about snapchat is most of the stuff that they like started doing that was really unique at the beginning.
Speaker 4:
9:02
Now Instagram credit co-opted. So the stuff that I could attached to like all the face filters and all that, others, you know, other shit and doing like live videos and your stories and all that, that's now all wrapped in industry. I'm, so that's all stuff I can get behind. And you can really see it as a marketer and then somebody's trying to push anything. Like, I can really see the value in Instagram now where I was pretty bad in Instagram, you know, five years ago, I can, uh, I can get it now. And they've added so many tools that make them different and this, and that's all it was. The thing to me about social media is, you know, how is it different in youthful, you know, like Twitter is different and useful in a way that like Facebook and Instagram are not. So, you know, I've been able to grasp the usefulness of Instagram recently as we started to launch this new brand. But snapchat is just one that I can't, I want to because, you know, it's hip with the kids, you know.
Speaker 1:
9:54
But I, I, um, I feel like I'm faking it. Every time I ever tried to post a snap fag. Got I snapchat snap fact go the we're talking about, I mean that they use snapchat. That's a snapback
Speaker 4:
10:11
couldn't do it. So we are sworn that off.
Speaker 1:
10:14
So I just read a book from Gary Vaynerchuk, um, uh, and it's called crushing it, um, uh, s uh, a SQL to his book, crush it. And I just finished it. And uh, yeah, I need to stop my snapchat game up. Uh, my Instagram game out my Facebook game up my musically, game up, my whats up app, a app on Facebook live. Uh, and I'm a wordpress up, so I need a lot of, uh, help. Reading that book made me realize I was clueless about social media. Um, so I'm working on it.
Speaker 4:
10:47
Well, it's easy to be behind. It's easy to like, to like be savvy, but still be behind. You know, you gotta stay up on all the time and it's like, it's constantly evolving monster, which is amazing to me. I love the Internet. I love it. I love social media. I love everything about it, even though it's invasive and scary and you know, it is the leader in skynet. Uh, I love everything about it cause it just, it, it at least is a capability, a human capability that we never had before. Like when you can establish a new line of communication between humans that did not previously exist. It's like evolution, which it blows my mind, the communication era. So, uh, I love everything about the Internet and social media, but yeah, it's a constantly evolving thing and you gotta you gotta stay up on it if you're a content creator slash promoter of any kind.
Speaker 1:
11:31
Yeah. Yeah. And as me and you both are, you do blind rhino. I do odd NJP line productions and I do oddball magazine. Yeah. We, we really try and stay up with the, um, the current technologies. But I mean, if I was like, well yeah, my mom gets her, her aol.com locked out, um, and she has to pay a money. So I don't know. I'm trying to stay current, so that doesn't happen to me. Um, but I have to agree with you, man. Um, it is a fun time to be alive. Um, and I will tell you why. I mean, yeah, so what the political landscape and the environment and everything is all Shem.
Speaker 4:
12:09
Well, so what the world's burner. Yeah. I mean I can see to someone in China right now, I can find cat videos
Speaker 1:
12:19
any time I want.
Speaker 4:
12:21
I used to go expensive when I was a kid. Calling to Indiana was, was what it cost like a couple hundred bucks. But why don't you call in the Ena? I'm not Indian. I, you know, actually I didn't call any data. I call it Michigan. I had friends in Michigan. This is a, you know, a little fact about me. I had friends at fish union high school. Snapback shout out to them, snap FAC Hashtag. How do you do that? Hashtag [inaudible] what do you do?
Speaker 1:
12:44
I'm Paula Poundstone friends.
Speaker 4:
12:48
So I had, I had friends from Michigan pound sign outside friends from Michigan and I was also kind of like a lonely romantic kid. So I would run up please. Long distance bills. We won't, we won't really dig into this right now, but it's actually a great part of my past, uh, about my work with youth groups and why I knew these people from Michigan. Anyway, this is bills and, uh, it was like several hundred dollars where as now I could facetime with any of them. Is that what the kids say face time? Uh, I can facetime any of them in a minute and like, and it would cost nothing. So that's pretty amazing. That's interesting thing about technology that like literally it would have cost a significant amount of money. Even like, even without inflation, like a significant amount of money in my life right now for me to make the same phone call connection of I, if I call it for like two hours to somebody on, you know, in Michigan, which I don't, you know, I don't talk to them anymore, you know, shows. Yeah.
Speaker 1:
13:46
Oh, a pound sign. Um, I missed you friends. I just think it's, it's quite, uh, I was just thinking like, you know, my growing up and, uh, thinking like, Hey, I play video games. I'm like, that's never going to make me money now.
Speaker 4:
14:06
Yeah. It could be professional video gamer and be a millionaire and a celebrity. That to me is like the craziest step in our evolution of the youtube culture. This is like a whole tangent, but I think that's the craziest thing. Like you could overnight become a millionaire, which you know, good. Good for you. It's like those, the pinnacle, the alternative entrepreneurial spirit also dystopian. And it's like how is it possible that you got intelligent playing a video game? But whatever, man, I'm not going to hate. But it's also scary that somehow that's how are we are scaled as a society.
Speaker 1:
14:43
Uh, yeah. And that's why I think prop that we both have shots and a lot of people who um, I mean has
Speaker 6:
14:52
a shot then the player, if you start playing super Mario brothers and get really good at it and film yourself and you have funny content, you could be a millionaire,
Speaker 4:
15:04
that is certainly a very, um, was it cynical or, and, or pessimistic view of our talent because people hit, anybody can make it. So you and I who think that we have something that you've created that's worthwhile. It does not matter because anybody can weekend. But at least we could possibly make it. I mean,
Speaker 6:
15:26
ever thought that like a fidget spinners would be like a billion dollar industry you can make money
Speaker 4:
15:32
was it was, it wasn't a billion industry. I think you're overstating the track. We're going to have to get our fact checker. Can we get um, Louis the booth? Louis, can you look over here? Can pick your lowest. Can you read this down? We're doing our fact check later on. Uh, Lewis is going to fact check. You Know Louis Jason is on my nose is bleeding all the industry. Louis, write that down. We'll check that later. All right, we're going to get back to him later on. So
Speaker 6:
16:04
sign, they've been just spinners. Yep. Yeah, that right there.
Speaker 4:
16:10
All right, so this has been a lengthy opening. We just wanted you to, to get our listeners, our viewers slash listeners to get comfortable here with the odd ball shot readers and our, and our readers, which in fact we don't have any readers here are the odd ball show, but we have several, several, we've one or two readers on the oddball magazine, which is a dope was poetry magazine on the East Coast. Yes, you should definitely check in with them and we'll talk a little bit more about what they got going on in our, what's going on segments. But um, if you're, if you are a poet, especially in the Boston area, uh, there were well connected with the Boston area of poetry scene, which was lively. Uh, if you are a poet in the Boston area, you should be published on a eyeball magazine. And if you are not, it's the Internet man touch. It doesn't matter where you live, but a submissions that eyeball magazines.com and um, uh, please go and read. They are active changing all the time and that's not easy to find in any kind of a medium, especially.
Speaker 6:
17:10
So, and if you're a listener on the odd ball show, please let us know that you're listening by leaving us a review. Um, pound sign. Um, it's Jason. Yeah. Yeah. Jason rocks at and profits cool pound sign. Um, yeah, that, that would be a really cool idea. Um, but also what I was getting at it was if you are a listener of the oddballs show and you are a poet or an artist, send your work over the oddball magazine. We would love to see it and, and it, uh, put the subject, you know, heard you on the odd ball show or something like that that lets us know that you're listening, that you like our content and um, you know, we'll check out your poetry or your art or your music or whatever. We're very open as the oddball on ball magazine and very nutty anti oddball show apparently. Um, so yeah. Uh, check us out. Um, and back to the shoe. All right, well let's,
Speaker 4:
18:09
let's, uh, let's dig in real quick with our um, and topics here on the show today. We wanted to talk, I don't know, you're a hi buddy. How do I write too many topics here on the show today we wanted to talk about, uh, the Nami walk that Jason did this week and his book, and then we went and talk about, um, I'm musically suppose. So here in the first segment, let's talk a little bit to Jason About, um, what he's got going on. So definitely, uh, the Nami walk here in Massachusetts. Um, Nami is an organization that we support heavily here on the oddball show that we've talked to several guests who are involved with. And, um, we have a lengthy history with, could you give us a little intro into what Nami is, uh, and how you got involved with this a walk? Was it this past Sunday?
Speaker 6:
18:57
Yeah, it was a, it was actually this Saturday. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Um, so a little bit about a Nami. Nami stands for the national lines and mental illness. Um, I think it's a great organization. Um, it's the first organization that I got involved with them, made me feel that I wasn't totally alone in the world, which I think is a remarkable, that I was able to be a part of Nami and continue to be a part of Nabi. Um, they are an advocacy, um, awareness and, um, uh, organization that really tries to support people with mental health concerns. Um, before Nami, I did not know anything about, um, uh, know that there was people out there who are like minded who also, uh, were once given a diagnosis, which, which is obvious. I mean like there's one in four people, you know, have some sort of sort of, or had been given a diagnosis of mental health at one point in their life. So, um, but I started off with Nami with in our own voice, which is a great pro program to speak to a hospital's like I, uh, and um, uh, hospitals and schools and prisons and police officers and churches, uh, and, um, colleges.
Speaker 4:
20:23
Well, let me just jump in real quick and ask you about that because we've actually had, um, uh, I guess on here whose name, I can't recall, a young lady who was also a part of in our own voice is her name. Amanda. Amanda Shea.
Speaker 6:
20:37
Yeah. Voices of anxiety. Yeah.
Speaker 4:
20:39
Okay. And here is an interesting point, interesting tangent. I'm pretty sure there are two. I met chase, there was one who's very active in the Boston hip hop. And for a while after we did the show, I was very confused, uh, after I saw the running into like, you know, online circles that, that mentioned Amanda Shea, uh, who I think is awesome and who I've talked to at some point. But, uh, uh, she is a different person than I am pretty sure that the Amanda Shay who was also involved with Nami and in your own voices in our, in our own voices. So anyway, that's a tangent, but my question really is, um, so you said that you got involved with Nami through in our own voices, what is in our own voices specifically. And, um, how did this all start for you? That's really my question. That's one I've not asked you before. As our, uh, as we've talked about it here on the show is how did this happen? Did this whole thing started for you, which is apparently a very big part of what you do now.
Speaker 6:
21:34
Yeah. Uh, well, to be honest with you, profit. I was not an advocate for a long time. I love very much ashamed of having a diagnosis that was very much in a big pit of pain. Um, I had a lot of difficulties. I was not seeking care of myself. Um, I was struggling trying to find solid work, trying to hide my mental health concerns from people, um, at work and everything. And I always, you know, I was always the person wearing the headphones. If you look at almost every picture of me ever, I have headphones around my neck or on, um, on me at some point because that was, that's how I escaped.
Speaker 4:
22:22
Well, I'm a big music listener to and, and who knows what my mental health like diagnosis would be as somebody who dove into my brain. But do you feel that your, um, your attraction towards music and attraction towards specifically, uh, like soul music headphones sitting on a train is a part of, is a part of link to causal link to your, um, your mental health diagnosis?
Speaker 6:
22:48
Well, that's a mental health condition. Yeah. I think, um, I think if anything is sued it. Um, there was so many times, and I'm speaking mainly about being on the, okay, so being on the train, right. Um, and that's when I wrote train of thought. Um, being on the train in a crowded train from in, in the middle of Boston during rush hour is really difficult for many people. Um, not having headphones for that, uh, is nearly impossible, was nearly impossible for me at the time. The, the most difficult time for me was whenever I had to, uh, be on a train or s like some kind of public transportation or somewhere, and my headphones died, or my eye iPod died. And why was that? So difficult because I had listened to my, my thoughts, I had a, uh, I couldn't distract myself with music.
Speaker 4:
23:47
So it's not really a social anxiety, it's all use something because suddenly all you saw was people that I knew. It was because you were then as yourself. It was true.
Speaker 6:
23:56
Yes. Yeah. And then all of a sudden the music, the music had a good, good way of just kind of silencing everything. You listened to the lyrics instead of your thoughts, um, and all that kind of stuff. And, um, I along the time I would listen to instrumentals when I was writing. Um, uh, actually now I, whenever I listened to an instrumental, I will write to it. Um, but then again, my, my mental health is vastly improved over the last few years when I was, um, in 2012, 2013, 2014 my met my mental health was pretty bad. Um, so fast forward to 2016, um, I have, I'm in a hospital and I find out about Nami. Um, I don't remember how I actually found out about them, but, um, I must've done some research or something or asked the person, the social worker who was discharging me to, um, to look up Nami for me.
Speaker 6:
24:55
So he looked, looked it up and gave me a piece of paper, um, that had like some of the stuff on it. Um, and then I ended up finding Nami in her own voice. And I, uh, interview, I reached out to a, a Williamson who, um, is one of my saving, saving graces, one of the best people I've ever met. Um, and she spoke with me for a little bit. Um, and then sooner or later then later I was invited to go to a workshop, which I had never been to a workshop before. I don't think, I mean I've, you know, been to college classes and all that kind of stuff, but I never been to a workshop to learn how to be able to tell my story. Um, and being a poet and a writer and an English Major was actually incredibly easy for me to get it out on paper.
Speaker 4:
25:45
Well, so that's pretty interesting too because was, so you had been a writer for a long time before this point. Right. You know, so that's producing because the, the, one of the main themes we keep coming back to, especially when we talk about Nami and, or in our own voices, is the power behind telling your story for folks with mental health condition that both what you're saying, like you're not the only one going through this. And, uh, there is, I mean, we've talked about, uh, um, peer support both with, um, in the medical field and we've talked about in many different fields, but like the peer support angle that when you share your story that there is, there are numerous people who could be connecting with that for the first time and having a moment of realization. So, uh, not just for you as a speaker, but for every listener you talked to that, that's a powerful moment. So, uh, you as a writer and as somebody who was, you know, attuned to that already, that must've been pretty, uh, pretty interesting moment.
Speaker 6:
26:50
Oh yeah, absolutely. I mean, if you think about it, right. Um, when you're a writer or a musician, what are you doing with communicating your story or your message to people? Um, so as a writer, um, you don't necessarily talk about, um, well, what I'm getting at is as not every, I mean, I know that like a lot of this stuff I talk about is my mental health, but at one, at some point you just have to say, when does mental health not become such a of for like a, a prominent part of someone's identity that, um, you know, like when you read a book from someone, you're not, you're not thinking that that person's okay cause they have like, you know, they're, they're okay for having a mental illness. You know what I mean?
Speaker 4:
27:39
So that's it. That's interesting to hear you say, because like, they're, I guess it's like a half empty, half full kind of whale or kind of, but like your, everything you do, your work, your daily work and your artistic work to me seems to touch on your evolution through that personally. And then like how you advocate for other people. Uh, so it's interesting to hear you say that like it's not necessarily about, uh, or some this, that part of it is about separation from it.
Speaker 6:
28:11
Yeah. No, you're not. I think I'm just, you as a writer with a mental health thing. I don't want to be just considered a writer with a mental health thing. Um, I'm just hereditary or I'm just a poet or an artist or I'm just a musician. Um, and you don't necessarily, um, it's nice to be able to be with a, with a community of people who have been given a diagnosis at some point, but, um, you know, to rely on the idea that, um, you know, you, you just have a mental illness. Um, I feel like that's, that's just not like conducive to an empowering philosophy of yourself. You know what I mean?
Speaker 4:
28:54
I think it's interesting. It's certainly an interesting, like a fine line between like the empowering nature of advocacy and like talking about it as much as possible in order to, you know, reach out to others and the other and it not becoming who the only thing you are. So I think, yeah, yeah.
Speaker 6:
29:14
It's certainly very interesting. Yeah, no, you're exactly 100%. Right. Um, as an advocate and someone who does identify with having a mental health diagnosis at some point in my life, um, I find that it's good to know yourself very well. I know myself I think very well. Um, but I, I feel like, um, it's also good to be able to look outside the diagnosis and, and, and not just think that that's all you are, just cause a doctor called you by diagnosed you're bipolar or whatever thing it was given to you at one point. Um, but it's really cool to advocate and tell that story just to know that like, hey, you can't, but I also feel like you're short selling yourself. You can live a good life even if you have mental illness. Like fuck that. You know what I mean? Like why can't you just live a good life?
Speaker 4:
30:13
Well you can, the thing to me is, is that it's a, it's a more informed view. Like every time we do a show with a guest who like, uh, I don't want to start rattling off names, but every guest that we've done on a mental health issue comes from a different perspective. And every time that they talk about it, I've learned something new. Like as far as it being a spectrum and it being a thing of like, it doesn't have to be the only thing you are but informs everything you do. So why is it a bad thing for that to be part of the conversation, you know, of course. And removing stigma and removing language that makes it such a, this is where people with mental things go is over here in this corner and maybe we can fix that. Maybe we can give them medicine and they'll like stuff that we can get them out of that corner.
Speaker 4:
31:01
But it's not really how the whole shit works, you know? And the more I, the more the, the, every single guest that we have on this topic, uh, I get a wider view of it that like we are, it really is a spectrum and we're all on it. And it really is a matter of like, all right, assessing and understanding. But, uh, there's nobody that, that there's no stigma is the biggest obstacle, I suppose. Yeah. And like, Eh, yeah, peer support is the biggest thing. And having people who have been through it is the single biggest tool, I think, from what I've seen, peer support seems to be the biggest tool. And every advocate goes, yes. Pure support. Yes, yes, yes. More peer support because it's gotta be a thing. It's going to be the most powerful thing for somebody with a mental health diagnosis to say, okay, you're not just a doctor like telling me what I'm supposed to be. You're somebody who's been through something similar and can actually give me tools of help when I'm supposed to do what, what is useful to me to do that one
Speaker 6:
32:07
holster said, yeah, 100% right on the dot there. Um, you know, uh, I, I feel like if I was, um, if I was given a peer support specialist 15 years ago, um, maybe I'd be different. But I think that having to go through it alone for so long, one, um, it took my weakness and made it a strength, which is cool. Um, and made me much harder, um, you know, to, not harder but like, you know, like stronger, uh, as things got, um, as I became more like a knowledgeable about, uh, myself and, uh, what, what were my, uh, what activated me, what caused me to uh, get, yeah, uh, you know, get riled up, what caused me to be anxious and all that kind of stuff. Um, and once I became an advocate, um, talking about mental health, um, I felt like that was a catalyst for change for me.
Speaker 6:
33:14
Um, and I think one of my goals is to keep on breaking down the stigma and that's why I put out books like this. Um, but at the same point, I don't want to be just like, uh, uh, put in a category of someone who is like, you know, a poet with mental illness or an an advocate for people who have mental illness. You know what I'm saying? Like, yeah, I can totally understand that. I think is a very fine line between having it be something that you're advocating for and having it be the only thing that people know you for hung. I don't, I don't, I don't know how, you know, you get that land properly or like what the right thing, like maybe the right thing is to say fuck it and like what they want or maybe the right thing is to navigate it.
Speaker 6:
34:00
I don't, I have no idea. But you know what is really very interesting, beautiful thing, a prompt about this and going back to the, the walk that happened on Saturday was there was 7,000 people at that walk who were all either friends, uh, family members, clubhouse members, um, you know, advocates, news, personalities, whatever, who, uh, media who are there, um, companies all who are supporting this. I'm breaking down the stigma, which I think is the most beautiful thing of, of all of them. For them to let me be on the stage and speak and, and try and empower the people who, yeah, they, they have a diagnosis, but they think that that's all they are. That's what, that's what I was trying to do, that, that's kind of like my bread and butter right there. So let's see. Let's actually get into some of the details of that.
Speaker 6:
34:52
Cause uh, uh, so you said 7,000 people on Saturday, and what was the theme center? Whatever of the walk. And part two of that question is why was it a walk? Oh good, good, good. Was it, was it all pledged walk or was it, who? Was there a different reason for it to be warm? So I think one of the reasons why it was a walk was because it was so, it was such a community oriented thing that it wasn't like a, it wasn't like a five k, it wasn't a running thing, it wasn't anything. It was a solidarity walk to raise awareness, mental health and, and you know, um, uh, mental wellness and, and just kind of living well with, do people pledge or no locked wrong? Yeah. You, you, each person could raise as much money as they possibly could. And they, and there's teams, like I was part of the, the, the agency that I worked for, I was part of their team. Um, and, and it's thought that was, you know, that was really cool.
Speaker 4:
36:01
So how far do you guys walk where the one go?
Speaker 6:
36:04
So it was that artists, Aami Park, which if your listeners, if our listeners don't know, it's, um, it's in Boston. Um, and on really nice part of the, the where the Charles, uh, Charles River. Um, I don't know you, there's like a bridge that you go to the Charles and then you, um, go down this main road and I think it's soldier's field or whatever. And then you go and basically it's a three mile circle that goes around artists, Aami park and the Charles River is really nice. I got some nice pictures of, uh, of, uh, you know, people rowing and things like that. And uh, it was really cool. It was a really cool, and so that would be the reason why I think it was a walk was for everyone to be able to do it. Not necessarily like just runners or whatever.
Speaker 4:
36:54
Right? On. Um, uh, I think, uh, well I met my question was even more than why was it not a run was why was it a a motion thing? Which, uh, you know, was there a oh money, money element behind it, but it's also pretty cool because you guys apparently had great weather is that, ah,
Speaker 6:
37:10
and, and, and, and profit. I think the really cool thing, and I just thought about it, it's a very healthy thing to do, one for your, for your mind to walk with all these people who are in solidarity and two for your, for your body.
Speaker 4:
37:23
So that was the thing that actually struck me as I was saying that I, as I started to say that last thing was, uh, you know, something about what you just said triggered it. That like it's just a healthy thing to get up and move and it's a solidarity thing. So like, even if there was no pledge behind it, rather than just gathering in a single place, there's, there's a power behind that action of just moving in mass and moving together.
Speaker 6:
37:45
Hundred percent, and it's a really beautiful event. Um, I was able to speak on stage. So what did you talk about? Oh Man. Um, so I spoke up about, um, you know what, I would read it or no, I read it. I read something that I read on stage. Maybe I will close off the, uh, the show with that as my Jagger thought cause awesome. That's fine. It's kind of a, it's kind of a long thing. But, um, it was a beautiful moment from, from me and I'm like, I just felt so grateful to be up on the stage, to be able to, you know, be supported by Nami, to be supportive by my agency, to be supported by my, my wife and, and my friends. It's really, it's very cool. Like tha the, the toddler, the tides are changing on mental health. People care now. And that's a beautiful thing.
Speaker 1:
38:39
I mean, I think that's certainly something as somebody who I still consider myself an outsider, even though like I said, [inaudible] you're an ally, an ally. I wouldn't say that I'm certainly an ally
Speaker 4:
38:50
and uh, probably not. I'm probably more than that. Like if somebody to drive into my brain, you would find some, a couple of diagnoses, but uh, I can certainly see that. Like, like I said, with every guest that we bring on the show, every, every conversation we have, the tide certainly seems to be changing and some of the biggest things that that are changing or like language and the way we think about it, which is very important, like any kind of, anytime you have real change, also the things that really need to change, you really need to see people go, we're thinking about this differently. We talk about this too.
Speaker 6:
39:23
Yeah, 100% what I'm talking, I'm trying to not edit it myself, but I'm evolving my language.
Speaker 1:
39:32
As long as it's on editing fucking PC shit. It's like, yeah, this is how it really is. So let's reflect. Yeah.
Speaker 4:
39:39
Got It. No language and the way that we treat it in the way that we, you know, not because we're trying to respect people because we're worried about hurting people's feelings. It's not that kind of thing. It's about a productive change, you know, which also comes with respect. But like really it's about like this, this is actually how mental health works. You know, more we learned about this is how it actually works and not, you know, stigmatizing putting in the corner. It's only some people and you know, any kind of negativity towards it. It's, it's, it's silly and it's counterproductive. So whatever, uh, that's where learning, learning more,
Speaker 6:
40:15
I think, um, you know, how we were talking about social media. Um, I feel like social media has been really good for movements. Um, and the mental health movement of breaking down stigma, uh, helping out the language and, and, um, you know, demystifying mental health, um, has been a kind of a beautiful thing with, that's what I've noticed with social media. Um, I, uh, do you, am I, am I off base and then, or do you, do you feel that way too?
Speaker 4:
40:45
I think the biggest thing about, um, what, what I've been able to notice about, I was talking about mental health is communication. So it's all about language and how people talk about how do think about other people and how we think about the way that we work as people. So then social media is all about that shit. It's all about how we connect with other people. So yeah, it can only know what, I mean I was going to say it can only be empowering, but I suppose it could be not that it could be illuminating and um, bullying in some places, which it is I guess. But for the most part, the biggest thing is connecting with other people so that you know that you're not the only one suffering with this thing.
Speaker 6:
41:24
Yeah. Yeah. Is this kind of, it is kind of a beautiful thing. It is a little bit of a double edged sword, but it is kind of the beautiful thing knowing that, I mean, you're not alone, but to that, hey, you are advocating for something that you've been living with for a long time. So that kind of stuff. It seems to be changing, man. Definitely the tide is definitely changing. Um, and, uh, the Nami walk was, uh, like a beautiful event. I spoke, um, Fox 25 was there, um, and I was introduced. Um, and then afterwards the mark [inaudible] bloom from Fox 25 said that I did a great job. And I, it also people in the crowd, uh, some people from Nami and people from my agency and friends and family and people who I didn't know came up to me and said, hey, great speech and thank you so much. That's exactly what we needed. And I loved it. So it was awesome. So, um, yeah, that was great.
Speaker 4:
42:23
So here's the other, one of the thing before we get into our break, cause we, yeah, you know, as we, as we do on the oddball show, you probably deal with the guests happens without a guest, doesn't matter where you were sitting, doing the odd ball show without microphones, it would happen. We cruise through our hour, we're having a good time and we're having what we're talking about, something interesting to us, which is really the best part. So, uh, we're cruising through our, our first part of the show here, but I did want to ask about, your book is now out. It's called train of thought for our listeners. Um, uh, that don't, that, don't listen to my intro that just skip past that part cause they find me boring. Uh, Jason is the founder and editor in chief of odd ball magazine, which is a great poetry magazine, a very active, lots of different voices, less different interesting columns. Um, and he listened to that. That is not tuned in. Please go and check it out. But uh, you also are one of the most active voices on that site with the jacket. Thought was she read at the end of every show. But you are now, uh, I've been working on this for awhile. Uh, train of thought. You are now a published author. Question number one, are you self publishing train of thought and what he uh, okay into that question first.
Speaker 6:
43:35
Well, um, so as, as I have been doing for the last couple of years, I haven't been putting books together cause I really enjoy it. I love the art. I've always loved the art of publishing. Um, and I feel there's nothing more gratifying than putting out a book of someone's poetry. In this case. I had been working on trainers left for awhile, so I said, you know what, I'm gonna, I'm gonna take this and I'm gonna, I'm gonna put it out myself. That way I don't have to deal with, um, you know, shopping it around to publishers. I can really use it as, um, something that, um, you know, I have full control over, you know, cause I think that's the best part. I designed it with the help of my friend Tj. Um, uh, and he did such a great job and thank you Tj for doing that.
Speaker 6:
44:23
Um, you know, I, I designed the cover art. Yeah. Tj did the cover art. Yeah. Um, Tj has done a lot of this stuff for a, the oddball magazine. He's been my friend for Millie, like it feels like forever. Um, and Jacob Tringale was, someone knows who, you know, we've had him on the show before. He, uh, he, uh, wrote me a killer quote for the back of the book and that was when I gave him an, an, uh, the first edition of the book. And since then I've edited the edited down and took all the stuff out that needed to be taken out of it. I'm very proud of this book. I, um, I was able to really read it with an editor's eye, um, and take out all of the fluff, take out, um, all the stuff that I didn't like. And this book really tells a lot, I mean the second page of the books as truth be told.
Speaker 6:
45:21
And that was the name that I put on, um, the book that I was writing it. And then on the train. And the best part about it is that this is a raw, rugged, maybe not rugged. And then living I'm through. It's raw. It's, it's an unscripted. It is difficult. It is, it is. Um, not, it is jarring to read. Um, and I think that might be the best part about this book is that it takes you from, from the, the first stop to the last stop and you're like, Holy Shit, I need to get off this drain. And, um, and that's train of thought.
Speaker 4:
45:59
That's well said. So that leads into my question is what, so, especially for somebody who was a poet who publishes regularly, who has his own magazine where he regularly publishes. So your poems are just, you know, weekly out, what is it that makes you a want to publish a book as opposed to do that, you know, in a magazine for them. What's the difference for you and B, how do you decide what goes into that book? What's the lowest of the, like, what's the test? What's your, does products, what doesn't, what doesn't get in? What makes it work? How do you, you know, and it's kind of a wide question for anybody who publishes a poetry compendium or any kind of like collection, they don't really understand that process. I think it's very interesting because it's different than doing like a narrative. Like you're, you're, you're writing a novel, there's a story, you know, a certain amount of like, this is Harry. This is how you know, when you are done. How do you know when you're done with the poetry collection?
Speaker 6:
47:00
Well, prof, um, the, the what, what I've noticed about, um, this book, the reason why it's not on the magazine is cause I wrote it down. I wrote it into, it was eight. This literally came from my notebook. If you were to look at my notebook that I wrote in and 20, 2012 or whenever these books to written, I didn't change a thing. Um, every poem that was written in that book, no matter how bad it was, um, I wanted to show what it's really like for someone who is, uh, you know what it was like for me on the train. I wanted to show him what that was like. Um, so all the poems that are on oddball magazine, on jacket thoughts, those come at different times. Um, but every poem I wrote in this book was written one after another from a notebook where I said it'd be a cool idea if the last line of the poem was the first line was the title of the next poem. And I did that throughout the whole book I silver district as much as possible. I did, you know, there was some reality didn't. Um, yeah. And, and there's a lot of stuff that I, I mean I put myself out there. This is a raw look at, at my poetry. Um, I'm not really pulling a lot of punches in this book.
Speaker 4:
48:16
Would you say that that's like the theme of the through line is like a, I know the train theme and I yes. Someone who used to ride the train a lot and uh, I like I used to write a lot on the drink. It was used to pee and I don't know what it is about it. It was like solid dude or the quiet or like the, I dunno, cigarette, it's concise amount of time. If you're riding from in Boston to anywhere out of Boston's, like all of a sudden our, so like you have that amount of time to sit down and do some shit where nobody else is in your space. Uh, I don't know what it is about it, but I used to read a lot on the train too. But, um, uh,
Speaker 6:
48:51
there were times profit when I love the train. There was times when I love the train, when I had my headphones, when I had my headphones on and notebook and my fault, my, my phone was fully charged and there was not many people on the train. I fucking loved going on the train. It was when my headphones broke. It was when my batteries died. That's when and, and, and like before I took my man, you know, whatever, that's when it was difficult, you know, but when, when everything was running smoothly, you know, it was really a really great, great experience. First, you know, some, some parts of it, but also, you know, I was working at a job where I wasn't treated correctly. Um, they didn't, um, really support the fact that I had a diagnosis. Once I told my boss that I had a diagnosis, he totally treated me weirdly.
Speaker 6:
49:41
Um, and, uh, I really had to hide that. So when I would get back from work, from, from, um, from, uh, the break, you know, like the lunch break, I'd put my headphones on. And that wasn't necessarily because I want to listen to music that was necessarily cause I couldn't stop. Um, you know, I was too effected. So, you know, so I mean, yeah, there was times when the train was good, but you know, for them, for them, you know, most of these poems, they were written. I mean, uh, I, this is a disclaimer at the very beginning of the book that says like, Hey, like these phones were written. Um, it, you know, they were written, uh, in, in the throes of anxieties, you know, strap in. Um, so, you know, uh, and it's really, um, you know, uh, it was really a great, uh, experience to be able to, um, to be able to write it.
Speaker 6:
50:35
So, um, yeah, so I think a prof, I, it'd be a good time right now, um, for me to break and do a, what's going on with Audubon magazine. So, uh, I'm gonna try and do that right now. So, um, this is what's going on with odd bone magazine for this week. Um, first off, uh, we, today we released the train of thought, um, a book that's available on audible magazine, um, as well as the column, um, Jagger thoughts. The poem from train of thought was, um, called same damn train Paul. Uh, and that was really great. Um, the, uh, and something that I wrote, the other poem, um, poems that were on the oddball magazine. Uh, it was a poem by Harry Ricardi with photography by, uh, Chad pronto released, uh, last Wednesday. Um, and we had the secrets of skinny people on Monday. We had Lindsey Vonn fee Avanti with her, uh, uh, feedback with little Steven.
Speaker 6:
51:51
Um, and we had, um, Fleming's Boban, uh, with his, uh, Arabic autism review. Um, and yeah, that's basically what we had going on and oddball magazine. Um, and yeah. Um, I figure it'd be a good time to, uh, to uh, take a break, uh, and um, go and we'll come back with the second segment. Um, so thank you all for listening to the odd ball show. Uh, we are a uh, cool, um, podcasts that you can find on iTunes, tune in radio, stitcher radio, um, and uh, all of your podcasting platforms. So, um, sit tight. We'll be back with segment two.
Speaker 7:
52:46
Yeah.
Speaker 5:
52:47
Hey there all you mammals and marshals. This is prof from the oddball show. If you've been tuning into our posture as podcasts and like what you've been hearing, why not pop over to iTunes and leave us a review? I choose not your thing. Well then come on over and follow us on Spotify, stitcher, Google play music and Buzzsprout. Learn more about who we are@oddballmagazine.com and JPL. I'm productions.com. Link up with us on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram. So this a tasteful yet inspiring postcard or just give us a Holler in nearest CB radio. Good Buddy. On behalf of Jason Rate and myself, thanks for listening to the odd ball show.
Speaker 7:
53:21
It's day two.
Speaker 4:
53:26
So that's what's going on with the odd ball magazine that dope, his poetry magazine, this side of the Mississippi. Please go and check them out at a humble, amazing.com and keep up with them at odd ball magazine on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, anywhere else that people actually follow social media. It's probably snapchat because on snapchat I dunno,
Speaker 1:
53:45
um, uh, that's probably back to Hashtag pound sign snapback outside snow pack. We are not on stove jet pound sign, snap snapback. So that's a lot going on at Audubon magazine, uh, as happens here at the odd ball show.
Speaker 4:
54:03
Um, when we're, we're having a good time, we're having a good conversation. We ended up running right through the hour, so we're going to come back on a separate show, a separate guest lists show and talk a little bit about blind rhino, my music. Um, a project going on with d plus, uh, alt rock hip hop duo. You can find us at blind run on music, on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook, uh, as well as youtube and soundcloud. Cause we just released our video for a circular logic. Um, so you'd find that on youtube circular logic. It's a pretty interesting video put together. I won't, you know, no, no, no spoilers, no spoilers.
Speaker 6:
54:43
Those,
Speaker 4:
54:45
but, uh, we'll, we'll, I'll, I'll, it's a pretty interesting video, uh, unique, odd whatever you want to say. Um, but go check that out and we'll talk more in a later show about, about that project as a whole and what's coming next from us as a duo. We're trying to add to our particular brand of hip hop, but uh, no problem being pushed out by some good conversation about, um, about mental health here on both, on the oddball show at large and uh, in conjunction with the, with the Nami walk as well as your, um, it's important to let our viewers know about your new book train of thought. So, uh, go. Definitely go check that out by that. Order it, download it, print it, give it to your friends, uh, train of thought. You find out about magazine.com one of the, uh, independent publishing productions from, from Modbar magazine. I, hopefully there'll be a more of those because as a kind of press keep publishing alive.
Speaker 6:
55:41
Yeah. I keep on, I keep on thinking that I'm just going to keep on going with this. I think, uh, I think I'm paying I, Yep. I been publishing, I think I'm going to, uh, put out, um, stone soups anthology next, um, stone soup as Chad print those baby that he's been nursing for so long and keeping going, um,
Speaker 4:
56:03
is one of the poetry scene for sure.
Speaker 6:
56:06
100%. And one of the best things about, uh, pro, uh, Chad is his dedication to the Boston poetry scene. And I would think it'd be cool idea, um, down the road if we put a little poetry anthology together of all the stone suit poets. Yeah. So, uh, that's the next, that's the next publishing venture for, for me. But yeah, right now we're, I'm going to be running with the train of thought for a little while. Um, and yeah, I don't know. I'm really excited about this one.
Speaker 4:
56:37
Well, they'll push it into shape and lime and then then we'll share it over on our various social media networks. So a train of thought, uh, uh, put was it called, uh, poems from the red line, which are the red line. Anyone who's ever sat in the red line and is a writer knows that that is certainly the time to write. So poems from the red line, it'll connect with you.
Speaker 6:
56:57
Yeah, I think if anything, it'll connect with Boston tea goers. Yeah. Also, there's a lot of, there's a lot of, uh, I don't know a lot of music references in the book, which I think a always lens, um, uh, some style to, uh, what I'm doing. And the cool thing about it is like, you can tell that I was listening to this when I wrote this and listen to this when I wrote that. So, um, there's a lot of references. So very proud of this book Prof. Um, I worked hard on it. I'm going to push it as much as I can. Um, and that being said, you'll probably be seeing more of me. I'm in the Boston poetry scene. Um, adds some more book events and seven,
Speaker 4:
57:42
push your push in hand. I was like, dude, you're the best. We'll do, I'll do a live podcast. You can perform and I'll just do it. Live Solo podcast that comments on it quietly like a golf tournament from the side. Oh Man. I think he's picking the three pager, the three page, the three page that's due and it'll be great. It'll be the Starbucks. It'll be awesome. We'll charge tickets. Anyway. Um, so let's train of thought. Uh, poems from the red line. Please go and check it out by it. Support local artists. Always a, that is in addition to our, um, strong advocacy for mental health, mental health awareness, mental health, removing the stigma, change the language, all of that. Our other strong advocacy is for local artists. So please go and support the local artists. They need it. They, they deserve it. God dammit.
Speaker 6:
58:44
Uh, local artists, local, a hip hop artist, local poets, locally,
Speaker 4:
58:48
Michelin Man. They're going out and they are entertaining and providing art and culture and real life stuff for you in front of you. So go and support them please. And buy this book anyway. And you know what prompt
Speaker 6:
59:01
since it's, since the Internet is the intranet is local. So we, so like basically, you know, you're a poet and artist and musician, a hip hop artists, we support you, you know, uh, you know,
Speaker 4:
59:18
whether you're, yeah. It can be right in their community at home, in your, in your dead. You can be part of this community is, I would have done, is that only on a 90 thing anybody ever done in their house? Laughs, yes. I feel like a den would be something that you'd have a leather bound books smell of fish and like what, what is it then? Is that where you kick off your shoes when you first enter the library? But for people who don't have a full dimension, yeah, it's bread. It's where you're going read, but you don't, you wear a smoking jacket, but you don't, it's the note you drink scotch. I guess that's what you do in a den. Those who haven't tuned into the Ron Burgundy podcast, we're not, we're not actually the sponsors or anything, but like, you really should. It's really great. Yeah. Uh, and, and, and run Burgundy is one of the best, uh, journalists of his time. I did about a thousand of them. I don't know if you heard me counting, but I did want to sound boring, but it's my life.
Speaker 4:
60:35
Thanks for tuning in. This has been the odd ball show. This is what we do. Uh, this has been a guest list cast as we call them. Will we do them periodically just to check in with the very active artistic enterprises that are both oddball magazine and Jpi productions under JP productions falls, this new music duo called blind rhino. So we telling you more about them and upcoming casts. Um, and there are all other kinds of RTC enterprises that were connected to that we like to support and push and that's how things happen. So, um, we are very glad to, to push anybody who wants to come on the show, come and talk about what, what you're doing, what you're working on. Um, we are the odd ball show where collaboration between all boy magazine, JP and I'm please come on, follow us at are just very social media networks at JPL. I'm at Dr. Brock, Esquire, uh, at eyeball magazine at Man the storm, uh, at blind run on music now officially.
Speaker 4:
61:27
Yup. On everything. On Twitter, Instagram, Facebook. Man. I kept the shit so that it wouldn't across everything because there was, there was at blind rhino on Twitter and Instagram. And the thing about trying to get one from like a dead account is it's impossible. You're not allowed to actually try to, to buy them from people. And the process of going about it is ridiculous. Not Ridiculous. It's difficult, but for like a good reason. Like you don't want people to just bind I counseling people and then become, then social media becomes for sale and all that kind of shit. But uh, is difficult to get an account from some, like at blind rental on both Instagram and Twitter are not very widely used, but it was better for us to pick one that went across all and at blind around music is the one that fits so confined us on all on as also youtube and soundcloud and soundcloud.
Speaker 4:
62:18
Right now is where is where you can find are later additions as the uh, we'll be pushing them as we'll be selling through bank, Kevin Shipper, um, for the opening e p I just want everybody to have it. So come find us on soundcloud. Nice. Everybody check out blind rhino on Spotify and a checkout a them on youtube and all of their actions. Not on, not on Spotify. You did say Spotify. Soundcloud. Spotify is, we are not on Spotify. Oh, I thought you said Spotify just as one. All of this is to be you well informed or you will not find us on Spotify. You may search anybody. That's probably a good band called blind Rondo. Maybe, I don't know from the eighties or something. You might find somebody keep looking. You might find that like a playlist on Spotify called blind rhino, which is cool because it means somebody that has some good teeth.
Speaker 4:
63:08
I support the individual, but you won't find out yet soon you will find this on Spotify. Right? Right. Now you can find us on soundcloud, soundcloud and Youtube, Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Nice profit. Now, let me tell you, let me, let me ask you, what kind of music is Brian Blind Rhino? Well, we like to call it a combination between hip hop and alt rock. So my Buddy d plus plays Bass Guitar. This is like mainstay. Um, but he has diverse influences. So he like, uh, when he plays some of his solo stuff, it kind of errs towards like a, uh, uh, beck kind of sound like very deeply produced and lots of layers and like a unique viewpoint. Um, and some of that bleeds into what he does is production. So that's him on beats and then some of the background vocals he's been doing now and then me on, on lyrics.
Speaker 4:
64:01
So, so it's a duo and uh, it's, it's a, it's a lot of fun for me as an artist and very different from I've done before, but we'd like to call it some kind of combination between hip hop and rock. And he likes to think more ultra rock. So nineties rock. Uh, I dunno, no one. I would tell, I will tell anybody who, who is a fan of a, of prompt to check out his, his, his music is pretty awesome. And Your Style prof is definitely unique and really, really well done. So, yeah. Cool. Thank you very much sir. I appreciate that. Absolutely. No, I mean, so I'm not bullshitting my friend. He is talented. Check them out. So that's blind. Righto. We'll be talking about more about them and them in upcoming shows, but this has been the odd ball show. Uh, thank you very much for tuning in.
Speaker 4:
64:49
Please give us a review on iTunes, whether you like us or don't like us, whether you hate us and love us, whether you are kind of ambivalent and just like, Hey, I listened to them. I don't have an opinion. I'm going to write that down. That's still an opinion. So we'll take her, uh, please come follow us. Please come be part of what we do. Uh, art is all about community. So, um, thanks very much supporting and we're going to close out the show with a Jason stock from is a Nami walk to this past Saturday. Um, uh, there's two, and then I'm prof has been the eyeball shot
Speaker 6:
65:21
and I'm Jason and uh, if you, uh, stay tuned, you're going to hear, um, let me just set up for you. We will, uh, a live recording of the Nami walk from, um, 2019 is Nami Walk Massachusetts at artists Aami Park in west, uh, in, in, uh, Boston mass. So check that out. I will be back in a few weeks. Uh, don't miss us too much. Find this on iTunes and stitcher radio and um, find this all on Facebook and everything. So we'll, we'll, uh, we'll see you soon. And I enjoy the, uh, live a speech that is gonna happen now.
Speaker 8:
66:09
He was a certified peer specialist. He's also the editor and the founder of Oddball magazine where his poetry column, Jagger thoughts can be found every Tuesday. He also hosts the odd ball show. It's a podcast and an active mental health advocate. He's also a great public speaker and a proud member of Nami that he also speaks in our own voice presenter as well as the, please give a big, warm welcome to Jason. Right.
Speaker 7:
66:35
Thank you so much. [inaudible] everybody doing
Speaker 3:
66:41
okay guys. This poem is called upon to remember while walking.
Speaker 3:
66:50
Every time I get onstage I think a how lucky I am to be able to do this. Not this speaking thing. No, I wouldn't give up speaking out for the world, but now I am grateful that I am still breathing grateful that I made it through. For those of you who identify with having a diagnosis ever, your friends and family, how did you make it through? Have you made it through? Do you have the support you need to put your best foot forward? Moving towards something that makes your life means something? If not, how do you get there? Let me tell you how I got where I am from the psych ward to the podium where I was before and where I am and where I would like to go. Believe me, it's not easy. Never has been. Never will. Life is a rocky road which you, you are resilient and parked that word.
Speaker 3:
67:45
It's your dialect, resilience, perseverance, steadfastness, stolen. What those words into your conversations when you're talking with yourself. I don't need to know your disorder, your diagnosis, your illness, your condition. Maybe someone does. And yes you should know your disorder, your diagnosis, everything about you that makes you, you. Let me tell you one thing that diagnosis, depression or Adhd, schizophrenia, OCD, PTSD, BPD or schizoaffective, you're whatever, whatever it is that a doctor told you you were behind, that there is a fighter behind that is courage behind that as strength. Those three words can get you far. Courage, strength, inspiration, aspiration from war, tenacity to make your goals, reality, empathy, whatever it is that makes your mood. So dazzlingly low or super high, empathy, how you identify. I say hold on to who you are. Don't let someone discount your experience if you heard voices and that is your reality. And I believe you cause I heard voices to the last time was the night of my nephew's funeral. Trauma will find its way to you. And when it comes stared in the eye and face it cause you got this.
Speaker 3:
69:20
So a little by me besides being a poet and a podcast or I am a certified peer specialist for remicide community care and absolutely wonderful agency. If you don't know what a certified peer specialist is, what that means is that you and I have lived experience as a peer specialist. I try to empower people to think beyond the diagnosis, but not every day is puppies and roses. I saw people that sometimes mental illness is just that an illness. Sometimes it's strong, sometimes it's my weakness. One of the best things about being up here is being able to be a change agent. Being a change engine is amazing. Being able to literally change the landscape when the landscape needs pavement, but with every building you need a good foundation and I think it's when you decide to be more than just the patient, but I have support.
Speaker 3:
70:18
I Have Lisa, I have my family, I have my friends, I have a clubhouse and I have peers, I have advocates, I have people like Eliza who believed in me. I have Chad who is a poet and my associate editor. I have prop who I podcast with. I have the people I've talked to and you who are listening. This one thing I know in life is that I can't do it alone, but for many years I did until I found this community until I became a poet. But before that there was poetry and oddball magazine, which I still carry with me proudly. In fact, you chat again for what we have done. Thank you rob for never town. The fourth issue is, sorry, my friend that we had issues, but I'm so grateful for you, but as I got strong, as I found my community, as I started writing those poems, as I started writing songs, I suffered for a time, but I don't suffer anymore or at least right now I don't.
Speaker 3:
71:18
I rise above the pain. I tried to, I know half the things in my brain are real and to the other thoughts, I despise you. You try to kill me on a daily basis, so many different to phase faces. We try to get inside my head and sad. Worthless at the bottom is going to fall out from under me. My thoughts telling me that my purpose is clouded, making a mess of me, a little input. Lamont getting by barely. Sometimes I have to look what I've done. Look at the music I've made, man, the storm. Look at the Polish community created into that. I've done a lot and there's still so much to do and tonight I say no, there's still a lot. We the mental health, hey, how's it do they continue to keep doing? I'm not being fake. This is not lip service. Empowered each other. Treat each other like sisters and brothers.
Speaker 3:
72:15
That's a illness is too difficult to come through this alone, but because of my illness, my condition, my disorder, my whatever, I learned a few things and let me part the parties and let you in on them. One in four people live with this. The same thing that I got and then I might say, you got this. Give it all. You got to take a shot. If you fail, get up. Try it again. I'm in your corner. I got your back. You can do this. What I'm getting at you. You are not alone. You have something that you can hold on to. It's called hope, a four letter word that makes the world beautiful. Yeah. My mind is after I took all my jabs and uppercuts, people call me every word you can think of. Think of it. Half of them still to my mind is still does.
Speaker 3:
73:09
If I hadn't walked 36 miles in mania, I wouldn't be up on this stage. And that's to say a few things about mental illness. Let's say top 10 best things about living with this one. Empathy. We all have empathy to music. Music was made in mania. Three poetry, poetry saved my life for solidarity to all the people who go through this. Five the community. Look around. We are doing it. Six peer support. That's my purpose. Seven Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson and Jimi Hendrix and other creators who are poets and artists. Eight van Gogh, Monet water lose. Some of the most beautiful things were created and depression. Nine Princess Leia who was a writer and advocate and a frigging princess at 10 you cause you got this. So everyone out there look to the person next to you. To the left than the right at you. They're probably your family. The ones who say good nights you. Maybe it's your club house friend or recovery partner or maybe you are alone, but you're not because this is a community. We are your friends and family. You are not alone. You can be whoever you want to be. You got this, I got your back and everyone here does too. Now let's enjoy this walk and go out and support Nami.
Speaker 7:
74:45
Thank you.
Speaker 5:
74:50
Thank you Jason. Outstanding.
Speaker 5:
74:55
Hey there all your mammals and marshals. This is prof from the oddball show. If you've been tuning into our preposterous podcast and like what you've been hearing, why not pop over to iTunes and leave us a review? I too thought your thing. Well then come on over and follow us on Spotify, stitcher, Google, play music and Buzzsprout. Learn more about who we are and oddball magazine.com and JPL and productions.com. Link up with us on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram. So this is a tasteful yet inspiring postcard or just give us a Holler in new near a CB radio. Good Buddy. On behalf of Jason Wright and myself. Thanks for listening to the odd ball show and stay too. This is the odd ball show, a podcasting collaboration from jeep elap productions and oddball magazine. Huh?
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